Sins of Lethe I: Greed (Lethe Aether Chaos #1) by Arden Aoide – Review by Julie #NerdGirlJulie

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Title: Sins of Lethe I: Greed (Lethe Aether Chaos #1)

Author: Arden Aoide

Published Date: June 26, 2015

Genre: Fiction / Dystopian

Rating:

1 star1 star1 star1 star

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***THIS BOOK WAS PROVIDED TO NERD GIRL IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW***

Synopsis

What would you do if you were betrothed to a monster? Could you be tied to a man whose most terrible secrets are buried with the dead? * What if you were given a way out? Would you take it? Even if it meant you would never truly be free? * Sins of Lethe pulls you into a patriarchal society of secessionist Texas. It’s far too real to be merely dystopian or futuristic. It is hopeless from the first sentence, but even though the outcome is bleak, we want to be a witness to Shula Kelley’s last day

***Adult Warning – May Contain Graphic Sex, Strong Language, Or Adult Situations. Caution Advised***
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***Julie #NerdGirlJulie Review***
 The series is dystopian–not zombie, post-apocolipsical. It is social-commentary on gender bias, bullying, using religion to control the behavior of a large group, and general hypocrisy. I haven’t read anything as thought provoking since I read George Orwell’s Animal Farm and William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. There is a generous smattering of sex and some very disturbing violence, but it is included to paint a picture of the patriarch, James, and his abuse of the absolute power he wields.

The series is excellent and a far cry from most contemporary literature.  It is dark, twisted and wonderfully different.

Not to Be: is a prequel to the Sins of Lethe series that was written after the first two novellas in the series were published.

A Consummation : Set in the year 2250. Texas has seceded from the US, and it is a country of its own replete with border crossing patrols/limitations. Women are subjugated to any male family member—by blood or marriage. They have no rights; they are chattel. Women are discouraged from learning and reading, and they are forbidden to read the Bible. The Bible is used as a means of controlling everyone’s behavior; everyone outside of Texas’ borders are considered sinners (think Sodom and Gomorrah).

Devoutly  explores hypocrisy. James, patriarch of the Agnesson clan, talks a good story about sin, God and the Bible, but he doesn’t walk the walk. He uses his power and social position to push his agenda. Behind closed doors the religious zealot answers only to himself. His treatment of his sons and their wives, his plans for an Arian nation and the means by which he plans to accomplish that are sadistic. His penchant for combining sexual acts and murder are barbaric.  Devoutly is about corrupt absolute power, control and sadism. It is hope for change.

To Be continues down a dark path. There are some disturbing scenes. There are some caring and sweet scenes (between the sons and their wives primarily). There are hopeful scenes as some start to question basis of their society and the means by which it is maintained. What I love most is Arden Aoide’s intelligent writing. She pushes the envelope of what most would find acceptable in an effort to make her readers think and question power and social mores/norms.

Insolence describes James Agnesson’s sons and daughters-in-law who stymie his evil efforts with the strength of their love and sense of what is right.

What Dreams May Come  is a commentary on tyranny, oppression and hypocrisy.

In What Dreams May Come the characters come together with a common cause: rising up against the social mores of secessionist Texas in the year 2250…or at least against the tyranny of patriarch James Agnesson.

Additionally, Josiah Agnesson is introduced. His fervent devotion to the church has allowed him to travel outside of Texas. His plans change when he finds one particular sinner who he would like to show the light.

Brothers Jude and Jared and their wives are strong. Sophia and Raphael as supporting characters are fabulous additions to the series. James Agnesson is downright evil in the worst self-serving way.

There are some disturbing scenes.  There are hopeful scenes as sane start to question basis of their society and the means by which it is maintained.

Arden Aoide’s writing is brilliant and provocative.  Ms. Aoide’s Sins of Lethe series is reminiscent of Bradbury and Orwell with a highly sexual twist.  She pushes the envelope of what most would find acceptable in an effort to make her readers think and question power and social mores/norms.

This isn’t a romance per se. It is futuristic and yet a throwback to the past. It is filled with social commentary. It is provocative. It’s a mind bender. It is corrupt absolute power, control and sadism. It is hope for change.  I highly recommend it to readers with strong constitutions and inquisitive minds; it is not light, but it is absolutely riveting and once you get started you will power through the story.

NC-17 content—for mature readers only.

 

***Review has been done in conjunction with Nerd Girl Official. For more information regarding our reviews please visit our Fan Site: www.facebook.com/NerdGirl.NG***

GR

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